Bibliography: Gun Control (page 10 of 10)

This bibliography is selected and organized by the Positive Universe website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Washington Congress of the U.S, Kim Hamrick, Nancy Kober, Daphne Northrop, Washington Center To Prevent Handgun Violence, Kathleen Vail, and William Modzeleski.

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on the Judiciary. (1995). Caught in the Crossfire: Kids Talk about Guns. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Crime and Criminal Justice of the Committee on the Judiciary. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session (February 3, 1994). Each day 13 children are murdered, killed by accident, or take their own lives with guns and at least 30 more are wounded each day. This hearing was held to hear the voices of children on the issue of guns to assist in the creation of a crime bill. Opening statements were made by the following U.S. Representatives (in order): Charles E. Schumer, F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr., John Conyers, Jr., Lamar S. Smith; Dan Glickman, Steven Schiff, George W. Gekas, and Craig A. Washington. Witnesses were: Alicia Brown; Margaret Childers; Tiffany Cruz; Marian Wright Edelman, Children's Defense Fund; Rushon Harrison; Zoe Johnstone; Ruth Leeds; Monique Malloy; Fernando Mateo, Jr.; Megan McGillicuddy; Deseree Troy; and Janea Wells.   [More]  Descriptors: Adolescents, Children, Crime Prevention, Criminal Law

Northrop, Daphne; Hamrick, Kim (1990). Weapons and Minority Youth Violence. Weapons violence is a major public health problem that especially impacts minority youth. Interventions designed to reduce weapon use by youth are categorized as educational/behavioral change, legal, and technological/environmental. Few educational programs currently exist, but those that do largely concern firearm safety courses, public information campaigns, counseling, classroom education, peer education and mentoring, and crisis intervention. Given that legal and technological countermeasures have difficulty in controlling weapons violence, education seems a critical first step toward a comprehensive approach to preventing weapons-related violence. Potential educational interventions include educating students and their communities about the dangers inherent in carrying or possessing firearms. Potential legal interventions include firearm legislation assessment, taxation, stricter licensing and registration policies, and bans on selected types of firearms. Potential technological/environment interventions include designing safer weapons, eliminating ammunition types, and modifying the adverse environment in which weapons are used or carried. A combination of strategies should be used, but before interventions are discussed, professionals must address the inadequacy of current information on which to base firearm policy, ethical and philosophical issues involving metal detector use, and the community's role. The appendix contains a list of 16 associations to contact for additional information.   [More]  Descriptors: Adolescents, Behavior Change, Community Role, Crime Prevention

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary. (1993). Children Carrying Weapons: Why the Recent Increase, Hearing on the Possession of Weapons among Children and the Presence of These Weapons in Our Schools, before the Committee on the Judiciary, United State Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session (October 1, 1992). These transcripts feature statements and testimony from a Senate hearing on gun-related violence among school children. Opening statements by judiciary committee members Joseph R. Biden, Paul Simon, Herbert Kohl, Strom Thurmond, and John H. Chaffee offer statistics and anecdotes about the increasing presence of guns on school campuses, the incidence of accidental and intentional shootings and suicides by children, and the impact of drugs and gangs. Testimony was presented by panel members: (1) Jack Vinokur from the Brandywine School District in Wilmington, Delaware, who explained the school district's student code of conduct regarding the possession of weapons and the background to the policy's development; (2) Lieutenant Thomas Byrne of the Chicago Police Department School Patrol Unit, who offered information on how children obtain firearms, why they carry guns to school, and how gangs impact children; and (3) Ronald Stephens of the National School Safety Center in California, who offered additional anecdotes about violence involving children, presented statistics on school crime and violence, suggested that children obtain guns primarily from home, provided an essay by a student about weapons at school, and discussed the influence of drugs and gangs on the proliferation of guns in school. In addition, Stephens suggested 15 ways in which Congress and local communities can respond to the problem. An appended statement by Michael K. Beard, president of the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence, proposes that reduced, and eventually banned, access to handguns is the most effective solution to gun violence.   [More]  Descriptors: Accidents, Adolescents, Child Health, Children

Center To Prevent Handgun Violence, Washington, DC. (1992). Straight Talk about Risks: A Pre-K-12 Curriculum for Preventing Gun Violence. Grades Pre-K-5. Straight Talk about Risks (STAR) is a pre-kindergarten through grade 12 curriculum designed to reduce the potential for children and teens to be injured or killed in gunfire. STAR is based on sound prevention practices developed from a pilot project in Dade County (Florida). The flexible format allows activities to fit into a 3-week classroom unit or be taught over a number of weeks. Parents are a vital link to reduce gun violence among children and teens, and their involvement is integral to STAR. This curriculum guide for pre-kindergarten through grade 5 contains the following sections: (1) "Before You Begin–Orientation"; (2) "Suggestions for Parent and Community Involvement"; (3) "Activity Plans and Bibliography for Early Elementary Students, Grades Pre-K-2"; (4) "Activity Plans and Bibliography for Upper Elementary Students, Grades 3-5"; (5) "Academic Bibliography for Educators and Parents"; and (6) "National Directory of Violence Prevention Resources." Included are 75 annotated bibliography items and 73 non-annotated bibliography items. Descriptors: Accident Prevention, At Risk Persons, Bibliographies, Crime

Modzeleski, William (1996). Creating Safe Schools: Roles and Challenges, a Federal Perspective, Education and Urban Society. Presents an overview of the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, a key federal program that provides funding directly to states and local educational agencies to facilitate drug and violence prevention programs. The Gun-Free Schools Act is also examined, and the major challenges communities face in correcting school safety problems are addressed. Descriptors: Conflict Resolution, Delinquency Prevention, Educational Environment, Elementary Secondary Education

Kober, Nancy (1994). Caring Schools, Caring Communities: An Urban Blueprint for Comprehensive School Health and Safety. This report synthesizes the presentations and discussions from a 1993 symposium on comprehensive school health and safety into a blueprint for urban action. The first part of the report summarizes the nature of health and safety problems in urban schools and discusses some of the barriers that hinder integrated solutions. The second part describes some model programs highlighted during the symposium because of the comprehensive strategies they employ to address poor health, youth violence, or both. The third part lays out a working definition of a comprehensive school health and safety effort and its components. Essential elements of the blueprint include: (1) locally developed solutions, (2) community involvement and support, (3) interagency collaboration, (4) public education and awareness, (5) effective administrative structures, (6) true integration of activities, (7) a supportive school environment, (8) school-based services, (9) funding and resources, and (10) Federal support. Descriptors: Agency Cooperation, Community Involvement, Comprehensive Programs, Educational Finance

Vail, Kathleen (1995). Ground Zero, American School Board Journal. In school systems with a zero-tolerance policy, principals must recommend that students who carry weapons on campus be expelled. Some critics say zero-tolerance policies do not allow enough room for exceptions. Describes the Gun-Free Schools Act. Descriptors: Board of Education Policy, Elementary Secondary Education, Expulsion, Gun Control

Center To Prevent Handgun Violence, Washington, DC. (1992). Straight Talk about Risks: A Pre-K-12 Curriculum for Preventing Gun Violence. Grades 6-12. Straight Talk about Risks (STAR) is a pre-kindergarten through grade 12 curriculum designed to reduce the potential for children and teens to be injured or killed in gunfire. STAR is based on sound prevention practice developed from a pilot project in Dade County (Florida). The flexible format allows activities to fit into a 3-week classroom unit or be taught over a number of weeks. Parents are a vital link to reduce gun violence among children and teens, and their involvement is integral to STAR. This curriculum guide for grades 6 through 12 contains the following sections: (1) "Before You Begin–Orientation"; (2) "Suggestions for Parent and Community Involvement"; (3) "Activity Plans and Bibliography for Middle and Junior High School Students, Grades 6-8"; (4) "Activity Plans and Bibliography for Senior High School Students, Grades 9-12"; (5) "Academic Bibliography for Educators and Parents"; and (6) "National Directory of Violence Prevention Resources." Included are 114 annotated bibliography items and 73 non-annotated bibliography items. Descriptors: Accident Prevention, Annotated Bibliographies, At Risk Persons, Crime

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