Bibliography: Peace Education (page 251 of 259)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Positive Universe website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Washington Peace Corps, Ranae Stetson, Hector Avila, Elton Stetson, Harriet Arzu Scarborough, Yoko H. Thakur, Mary Goethals, Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development. New York State Education Dept., Ruth Perlow, and Keith Spencer.

Bloomgarden, Dave (1983). Stimulation Activities: Age Birth to Five Years. This handbook provides a collection of stimulation activities that encourage a child's physical and mental growth from birth to five years of age. Emphasis is placed on making stimulation aids that are inexpensive or can be made from scrap materials. Advice is given about ways to carry out designated activities. All activities have been tried and tested over a 2-year period in collaboration with the Jamaican National Day Care Program. Activities are categorized under the headings infancy, cognitive, gross motor, and fine motor.   [More]  Descriptors: Cognitive Development, Day Care, Developing Nations, Early Childhood Education

Thakur, Yoko H. (1995). History Textbook Reform in Allied Occupation Japan, 1945-52, History of Education Quarterly. Observes that, although textbook reform in occupied Japan originally supported democratic principles of openness and competition, it later became a mechanism for anticommunist censorship. Maintains that interpretations of Japan's military conduct remain highly politicized and controversial. Descriptors: Censorship, Controversial Issues (Course Content), Curriculum Development, Democratic Values

Palmer, Virginia C., Ed. (1983). Reforestation in Arid Lands. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Manual M-5. This manual presents some current, state-of-the-art examples of forestry programs in West Africa. It is based on the collective experiences of foresters and of local farmers and herders. Since many of the problems of reforestation of dry areas are the same worldwide, the text (which focuses on the broad subject of project implementation) includes methods and planning guides useful in more than a West Africa context. Following an introduction, text material is presented in sections discussing: (1) long-range planning (present land uses, community involvement, selecting sites); (2) soil and water (erodability, shallowness, texture, compaction); (3) selecting appropriate species; (4) project planning (natural regeneration, direct seeding, cuttings, nursery planning, design considerations, seed preparation); (5) nursery management; (6) the planting site (preparation, lifting out, transporting, and planting, spacing, survival); and (7) uses and prevention of fires, windbreaks, and sand stabilization. Appendices include: a directory of 165 West Africa trees; an expanded look at 30 of these trees; maps and charts explaining climate, rainfall, soil, vegetation, and characteristics of sub-Saharan West Africa; guide to writing funding proposals for reforestation projects; and a list of information sources and bibliographic materials. The manual assumes basic familiarity with reforestation terms and methods.   [More]  Descriptors: Botany, Classification, Community Involvement, Developing Nations

Perlow, Ruth (1994). Environmental Activities for People Who Use English as a Foreign Language. This booklet is intended for use by educators interested in developing environmental vocabulary and stimulating environmental awareness in adults and adolescents who use English as a foreign language. Activity participants are engaged in discussion and analysis, games, field trips, story reading, and projects. Activities are separated into 12 units that correspond to the following topics: (1) land use planning; (2) air pollution; (3) nuclear energy and the media; (4) recycling; (5) river monitoring; (6) environmental health; (7) environmental comparative risk assessment; (8) eco-tourism; (9) social action; (10) birds; (11) environmental ethics; and (12) miscellaneous activities some of which meet the needs of leaders presenting environmental issues to groups in 4 to 5 day workshops. Sections contain 1 to 15 activities with varying time requirements. Activity instructions include several paragraphs of procedural information and may include worksheets.   [More]  Descriptors: Air Pollution, Elementary Secondary Education, English (Second Language), Environment

Spencer, Keith; And Others (1994). Learning through Visions–Primary Grades: A Resource Guide for Early Childhood Services and Grades One, Two and Three. The goals of this curriculum resource guide are to: (1) explore subject integration at the primary level through the reflective experiences of educators; (2) provide visual and verbal activities that enhance student learning; (3) provide a forum for educators to present their instructional experiences through the theme across the curriculum approach; and (4) provide a resource for flexible curriculum implementation that adapts to the needs of individual students and educators. There are four sections in the guide, one for each grade from early childhood classrooms to grade three. Each section, written by a different educator, has the following components: (1) a philosophy; (2) an introduction to the section theme; (3) 5 general learning expectation questions; (4) 5 major activities; (5) 5 extended activities; (6) 15 support activities provided by the authors other than the section author; and (7) blank forms that invite the educator to design more creative activities. Each section has an appropriate theme and central topic for the grade level, and activities are based on learning expectation questions concerned with: general definitions, people, environment, matter, and animals. The theme and central topic of each section are: early childhood services–identity and my world; grade one–interaction and seasons; grade two–change and culture and traditions; and grade three–movement and patterns. Flash cards of student artwork, with brief critiques, are provided to strengthen art appreciation skills and to introduce document themes as story starters and bulletin board displays. Contains 23 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Curriculum Guides, Developmentally Appropriate Practices, Early Childhood Education, Integrated Activities

Miller, Kenton R. (1989). Planning National Parks for Ecodevelopment. Methods and Cases from Latin America. Volumes I and II. Reprint R073. This book deals with methods for planning national parks to enable them to provide the greatest benefit to human activity. Chapters included are: (1) "A Conceptual Framework for the Management of Wildland Resources"; (2) "The Growth and Development of National Parks in Latin America"; (3) "Planning National Parks for Ecodevelopment in Latin America"; (4) "The Evolution of National Park Planning in Latin America"; (5) "A Practical Method for Park Planning"; (6) "A Practical Method for Planning National Park Systems"; (7) "The Formulation of a Strategy Plan"; (8) "Human and Institutional Capacity to Manage National Parks"; (9) "Some Guidelines from Park Management Experience in Africa"; (10) "Major Problems Facing National Park Management in Latin America"; (11) "International Cooperation and Assistance in National Park Management"; and (12) "Strategy for Regional and Global Cooperation." Appendices are inserted in each chapter, and a 22-page index has been supplied.   [More]  Descriptors: Ecology, Environmental Education, Facility Planning, Foreign Countries

Stetson, Ranae; Kelly, Janet; Stetson, Elton (1998). Building a Civil Society: Are Schools Responsible?. This study identified teachers' perceptions of violence in society and in schools and the responsibility of schools to help create a more civil society. Participants were 78 predominantly white elementary and secondary teachers taking a graduate class at a Texas university. Each participant completed a survey instrument, "Are Schools Responsible for a Civil Society?" that focused on teachers' perceptions of violence in society and in the schools and asked about the causes of violence and civil disobedience, types of violence they witnessed most often, who they believed was responsible for developing a civil society, and the extent to which their schools or districts provided staff development for teachers and/or students. The final question asked what message they would like the outside world to get about the school's responsibility for violence prevention in society. Most teachers felt violence had increased in society and in their schools in recent years. About three-quarters of the teachers surveyed said schools had organized programs in place to deal with the problem. Just over half felt the primary cause of the increase in violence was lack of parental influence (followed by media influence). Nearly 60 percent believed that schools were extremely responsible for helping develop a civil society. Less than half had any training at all on the issue. The survey instrument is attached.   [More]  Descriptors: Civil Disobedience, Conflict Resolution, Elementary Secondary Education, Higher Education

Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div. (1985). A Manual on Conservation of Soil and Water. Appropriate Technologies for Development. R-38. In order to keep the land productive, a good conservation program is imperative. The primary purpose of soil and water conservation is to prevent soil erosion and heal its scars. This handbook explains the causes, processes, and consequences of soil erosion and depletion, and describes major soil- and water-conservation measures. This book was prepared for the use of officials, technicians, and agriculturists interested in controlling wind and water erosion and making better use of rainfall available and irrigation water throughout the world. Main topics included are: (1) "What is Soil Erosion"; (2) "Classifying Land Capability"; (3) "Preventing and Controlling Gullies"; (4) "Woodland Improvement"; (5) "Terracing"; (6) "Stripcropping"; (7) "Cover Crops"; (8) "Soil-depleting, Soil-conserving, and Soil-building Crops"; (9) "Pasture Improvement"; (10) "Rangeland Improvement"; (11) "Conservation Irrigation"; (12) "Farm Drainage"; and (13) "Conservation Nurseries."   [More]  Descriptors: Agronomy, Conservation (Environment), Depleted Resources, Environmental Education

Scarborough, Harriet Arzu; Goethals, Mary; Martinez, Ariela; Borsellino, Christopher W.; Tully, Kris; Pfeuffer, Vera (1998). Joining the Dialogue: Six Teachers Discuss Making Changes toward a Multicultural Curriculum (Rainbow Teachers/Rainbow Students), English Journal. Presents six brief articles by six Arizona teachers offering their reflections about practices, strategies, and vision as they make changes toward a multicultural curriculum. Descriptors: Class Activities, Cultural Differences, Cultural Pluralism, Curriculum Development

Delisle, Gilles L.; Avila, Hector (1968). A Microwave Course in Spanish (for English Speakers). This textbook is designed for English-speaking students of Spanish. The distinctive feature of a microwave course is the emphasis on communicative use of each structural element as soon as it appears. The principal component is a series of 'cycles' which, because of their extreme shortness, have been given the name 'microwaves.' This text consists of 106 cycles, each written first in English and then in Spanish. Each cycle begins with the introduction of new material and ends when that same material has been used for purposes of communication. Each cycle consists of an "M phase" and a "C phase.""M" stands for mimicry of pronunciation, manipulation of grammatical elements, learning the meaning of the words and sentences, and a certain degree of memorizing. "C" stands for connected conversation and communication. The "microwave" part of the text is supplemented by "Situational Problems" and "Debate Topics." These are to be used at regular intervals in order to allow the students to manipulate and use the verbal responses that they have learned. They also serve as an added stimulus in providing variety to the regular classroom situation.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Communicative Competence (Languages), Grammar, Instructional Materials

Ryan, Jean Rogers (1987). Tools for Teaching. A Visual Aids Workshop and Instruction Manual for Health Educators. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint Series No. R-67. This manual was developed to train primary health care facilitators and health educators in the construction and use of low-cost supplementary learning materials that are both socially relevant and participatory in nature. The curriculum is organized to provide the facilitator with a course outline and syllabus, suggested list of supplies, comprehensive lesson plans, supporting visual material and instructional handouts, project evaluation sheets, and a take-home examination. Each lesson plan includes the following components: (1) purpose; (2) objectives; (3) materials needed; (4) preparation instructions; (5) activity sequence, including estimated time for each activity; and (6) step-by-step outline for each activity. Supplementary materials are located immediately following the introductory page of the session in which they are to be used. The manual is designed to be used in staff development workshops for health facilitators working primarily in developing countries.   [More]  Descriptors: Developing Nations, Foreign Countries, Health Education, Learning Strategies

Carifelle, Debbie, Ed.; And Others (1994). Student Expressions Anthology. Elementary. Part of a series of books written and illustrated by the students of Northland School Division, Alberta, Canada, this anthology of elementary school student writing honors the spirit and authentic voice of young people. The writing selections in the book are made accessible to educators so that a bridge of understanding can continue to be built between young people and the adults who teach them. The book includes journal entries, personal essays, poetry, letters, interviews, short stories, picture stories, and art work. Items in the book provide a glimpse into the young person's world of thoughts, ideas, hopes, dreams, and concerns.   [More]  Descriptors: Creative Writing, Elementary Education, Elementary School Students, Foreign Countries

Palmer, Virginia C., Ed. (1979). Reboisement des Terres Arides. (Reforestation in Arid Lands. Manual M5A). Appropriate Technologies for Development Series. This is the French translation for a manual which presents some current, state-of-the-art examples of forestry programs in West Africa. It is based on the collective experiences of foresters and of local farmers and herders. Since many of the problems of reforestation of dry areas are the same worldwide, the text (which focuses on the broad subject of project implementation) includes methods and planning guides useful in more than a West Africa context. Following an introduction, text material is presented in sections discussing: (1) long-range planning (present land uses, community involvement, selecting sites); (2) soil and water (erodability, shallowness, texture, compaction); (3) selecting appropriate species; (4) project planning (natural regeneration, direct seeding, cuttings, nursery planning, design considerations, seed preparation); (5) nursery management; (6) the planting site (preparation, lifting out, transporting, and planting, spacing, survival); and (7) uses and prevention of fires, windbreaks, and sand stabilization. Appendices include: a directory of 165 West Africa trees; an expanded look at 30 of these trees; maps and charts explaining climate, rainfall, soil, vegetation, and characteristics of sub-Saharan West Africa; guide to writing funding proposals for reforestation projects; and a list of information sources and bibliographic materials. The manual assumes basic familiarity with reforestation terms and methods.   [More]  Descriptors: Botany, Classification, Community Involvement, Developing Nations

Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div. (1982). Audio-Visual/Communications Teaching Aids Packet. Supplementary Materials. Packet P-8. This packet contains three handouts on training theory and the use of audiovisual aids, as well as a section on materials and presentation techniques for use by community development workers concerned with exchanging information and working with the people in a community. The first handout, "Communication in Development," briefly discusses the four steps in the communication process: attention, understanding, acceptance, and action, and presents a seven step procedure to be followed for improving communications. The second handout, "Why Use Communications Media?", describes and pictorially represents the major categories of media: publications and pictorial, display, projected, audio, and broadcast materials. "Planning: A Guide for Decisions in Communications," the third handout, addresses four questions which should be considered in designing and planning effective communications. The Materials and Techniques section provides instructions for making and/or using bamboo or reed writing pens, brushes, crayons, pocket charts, puppets/puppet stages, flannel boards and flip charts, exhibits and bulletin boards, a flashlight slide projector and filmstrip adaptor, and radio.   [More]  Descriptors: Audiovisual Aids, Audiovisual Communications, Audiovisual Instruction, Communication (Thought Transfer)

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development. (1970). American Civilization in Historic Perspective, Part I. A Guide for Teaching Social Studies, Grade 11. This teaching guide offers illustrative and reference materials that are both narrative and graphic on the three topics of Mass Media, Conflicting Ideologies, and Social Control. The objective is to furnish primary materials on these topics not easily available to teachers. Emphasis is on organizing the selections as short cases or studies. Related understandings are grouped together to emphasize this approach. The inductive method encourages students to examine the presentations objectively, analyze and interpret them in terms of the medium, and consider the historic development of the issues. Section 1, Mass Media, presents a study of the Power of the Press: A Case Study of the Tweed Ring, and the Mass Media Today, including the Agnew address and related material on network censorship. In section 2, Conflicting Ideologies, variations in the role and attitude of the pacifist in different periods of U.S. history and conflicting views regarding the influence of Communism in American life are given. The purpose of section 3, Social Control, is to develop some understanding of the limitations which must be observed, even in time of crisis, when hysteria urges the forgetting of those values of individual rights and human dignity which are implicit in democracy. The Japanese-Americans in World War II are examined. Descriptors: Case Studies, Communism, Grade 11, Historiography

Leave a Reply