Bibliography: Peace Education (page 235 of 259)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Positive Universe website. Some of the authors featured on this page include EUGENE I. JOHNSON, B. Thomas Trout, Fran Schmidt, Jon Rye Kinghorn, Neil Jarman, Jonny Byrne, Shelly Singer, Salem. Oregon State Dept. of Education, Washington Association for Childhood Education International, and Warren H. Donnelly.

JOHNSON, EUGENE I. (1967). EXTENDING THE EDUCATIONAL INFLUENCE OF TELEVISION BROADCASTS. TWO APPROACHES TO EXTENDING THE EDUCATIONAL INFLUENCE OF TELECASTS ARE DISCUSSED. THE FIRST APPROACH TAKES OFF FROM THE TELEVISION BROADCAST, THE EFFECT OF WHICH CAN BE HEIGHTENED BY DIAL ACCESS LIBRARIES OF MAGNETIC TAPE RECORDINGS, OPEN LINE PROGRAMS, DISCUSSION GROUPS, SIMULATION OR GAMES, AND THE PUBLICIZING OF OTHER RESOURCES, ALL OF WHICH HAVE BEEN USED SUCCESSFULLY, AND BY INTERACTION WITH THE BRAODCAST VIA SELECTION OF SUBPROGRAMS, WHICH IS TECHNICALLY POSSIBLE BUT HAS NOT YET BEEN USED. THE LEARNING SYSTEM APPROACH USES TELEVISION IN CONNECTION WITH OTHER EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS OR EXPERIENCES TO ADD VARIETY, DEPTH, OR APPEAL TO THE WORLD AFFAIRS EDUCATION PROGRAMS. THE METROPLEX ASSEMBLY CAN CLOSE TO ILLUSTRATING THIS APPROACH IN COMMUNITY EDUCATION. IT WAS UNIQUE IN THAT THE PERSONS RESPONSIBLE FOR DEVELOPING DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE PROGRAM MET TO AGREE ON OBJECTIVES, UNDERLYING CONCEPTS, MAIN ISSUES TO BE RAISED, AND VALUE CONFLICTS IN THE COMMUNITY.   [More]  Descriptors: Audiovisual Aids, Audiovisual Communications, Educational Technology, Multimedia Instruction

Schmidt, Fran; Friedman, Alice (1985). Creative Conflict Solving for Kids, Grades 4-9. Second Edition. Intended to challenge students in grades 4-9 to deal creatively and constructively with conflict, this interdisciplinary resource book contains 40 reproducible student worksheets that can be incorporated into social studies, science, and language arts curricula. Teaching techniques include modeling, mediation, problem-solving, brainstorming, role playing, visualization, body movement, and integration of conflict-resolution concepts. Lessons encourage students to develop positive interpersonal skills, respect human differences, understand the causes of conflict, practice conflict-resolution strategies, learn ways to handle frustration and anger, and explore conflict as a positive force for change within the democratic process. Incorporated within the text, the teacher's guide presents major concepts, important vocabulary, teaching suggestions, discussion questions, and extension activities for each lesson. A posttest concludes the booklet. Descriptors: Conflict, Conflict Resolution, Decision Making, Interdisciplinary Approach

Trout, B. Thomas; And Others (1983). National Security in the Nuclear Age. A Conference for State Social Studies Coordinators on Pre-Collegiate National Security Education (Washington, DC, June 26-July 1, 1983). This conference report addresses education on national security and international relations in secondary school courses in the social studies. Main conclusions of the conference are: (1) Topics on national security should be added to the secondary school curriculum. (2) Current institutional and instructional settings are open to inclusion of national security topics into the curriculum. (3) State social studies coordinators are key actors in efforts to include national security in the secondary school curriculum. (4) Materials available for use in secondary school courses tend to be biased, doctrinaire, or overly technical and thereby unsuitable for the general education of citizens. (5) New instructional materials should be developed that are concept-based, clear, and balanced with respect to presentation of various points of view and avoidance of special pleading or promotion of causes. (6) Enduring curriculum improvement requires in-service education of teachers. (7) The subject matter of national security provides a common frame of reference for curriculum improvement, which might take various forms suitable to different regions or school districts. (8) Selection of development. (9) Appropriate points of entry exist for introduction of national security topics in the social studies curriculum. (10) Effective programs for curriculum change must address the role of the teacher. (11) There must be close collaboration between academic specialists in national security and specialists in curriculum and teaching to bring about enduring and effective reform of education about national security in secondary schools. Descriptors: Curriculum Development, Disarmament, Education, International Relations

Schmidt, Fran; Friedman, Alice (1990). Fighting Fair. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for Kids. Second Edition. This curriculum guide for grades 4 through 9 uses the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., to teach conflict resolution and to explore the philosophy of non-violence for daily life. To enable students to learn and apply non-violence, it must be modeled in a classroom environment that builds trust and a sense of community. Each of the following sections of the Teacher's Guide contains student activity suggestions: (1) "See Yourself"; (2) "A Strong Man"; (3) "People Power"; (4) "Fighting Back"; (5) "Confronting Fear"; (6) "You Are You, I Am Me, We Are Us, Us Are We"; and (7) "The Power of Nonviolence." An appendix contains a Peacemaker certificate as a student award and a list of 10 other resources. Student pages parallel the teacher guide, in the same chapter format. Role playing is a significant part of the student activities suggested; and brainstorming, problem solving, and decision making are also promoted. An 18-minute video completes the program. Scenes from the civil rights movement are used to help students understand the dynamics of non-violence. Descriptors: Black Leadership, Brainstorming, Children, Community Leaders

Cook, Sharon Anne (2006). "Patriotism, Eh?" The Canadian Version, Phi Delta Kappan. How does patriotism look north of the 49th parallel? In this article, the author explores the answers to this question and examines the "quiet nationalism" that characterizes Canadians' views of themselves and their nation. One of Canada's best-known philosophers, John Ralston Saul, argues that Canada's contribution to the world has been to build a new type of quiet nationalism, characterized most fundamentally by the tradition of compromise between the three founding people: French, English, and First Nations. Adding to its heterogeneous mixture, Canada has welcomed a larger percentage of immigrants compared with its population base than has any Western nation over the past century, Saul asserts, including the United States. The concepts and proclivities underpinning this tradition of compromise–self-effacement, careful and endless debate on a shifting agenda of priorities, the notion of "limited identities" to describe the range of competing factors (regional, linguistic, racial, and ethnocultural among others) in every Canadian's sense of self–all of these are incompatible with strident patriotic fervor. In fact, patriotism is actively feared as having the potential to undo this frail consensus. Through the school curriculum, particularly in the prescriptions for history and social studies, objectives for citizenship training in this country have privileged understanding through debate rather than patriotism. Both curricular and school authorities have consistently taken the position that, while loyalty is good, patriotism is to be approached with caution.   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Patriotism, Immigrants, Nationalism

Stone, Frank Andrews (1984). Teaching Genocide Awareness in Multicultural Education. Ethnic Studies Bulletin Number Six. Rationales, approaches, and constraints on genocide awareness education at all school levels are discussed. It is critical that students, especially U.S. students who live in a culturally pluralistic society, be made aware of how genocide was perpetrated in the past and of the fact that it is still happening today. A basic genocide awareness glossary is provided. Seven approaches to genocide awareness education are discussed: (1) an international law and world order theme; (2) socio-economic inquiries concerning the causes of genocide; (3) historical studies; (4) affective interpretations based on first-hand accounts; (5) human rights activism; (6) recognition of those who refuse to take part in genocide; and (7) the development of theoretical models of genocide prevention. Four constraints on genocide awareness education are examined: it is uncomfortable and unpopular to teach children about death and destruction; it is politically controversial; there is an ambivalence about U.S. government policies toward minorities; and it is difficult to find a manageable way of teaching the topic. The conclusion, however, is that genocide awareness education must be integrated into the entire curriculum.   [More]  Descriptors: Controversial Issues (Course Content), Cultural Awareness, Cultural Differences, Cultural Pluralism

Kinghorn, Jon Rye (1979). Implementation Guide: School Improvement through Global Education. To aid high school classroom teachers as they develop and implement programs on global issues, the workbook presents suggestions on program procedures and on tailoring global education programs to meet individual school needs. The workbook begins by exploring global interdependence and stressing that major reasons for offering global education programs include: helping students prepare for life in the 21st century, exposing students to people and things to which they are not accustomed, and helping students recognize the value of different opinions. A major objective is to increase cooperative attitudes in the classroom as well as in relation to world affairs. Another section explains how teachers can review various types of global education programs (for example, those based on places and events, cultures, actors and interactors, and/or issues) to determine which emphases will contribute most to the program for their school. Also discussed are general process objectives which should be incorporated into all global education programs. These objectives include that the school district should approve the program, the staff should make decisions collectively, the program should be interdisciplinary, and students and teachers should work together to plan, implement, and evaluate the program. A final section outlines and explains how to elaborate on process objectives in areas of staff and administrative adoption/approval, school commitments and responsibilities, curriculum, and evaluation. Descriptors: Cultural Awareness, Cultural Differences, Definitions, Educational Environment

Singer, Shelly (1988). Violent Reform: Costa Rica, Central America's Exception, Councilor. Examines factors contributing to Costa Rica's peaceful status in a region of violent political conflict. Describes the country's political and educational systems, stating that its democratic government allows the country to withstand many problems typical of the region and that its high level of education allows it to maintain the highest per capita income in Central America. Descriptors: Democracy, Democratic Values, Educational Practices, Elementary Secondary Education

Association for Childhood Education International, Washington, DC. (1972). Children and International Education. Developed as a plan of action in international education for teachers and students, this portfolio emphasizes the importance of developing a knowledge and appreciation of others, the acquaintance of resources for planning experiences of international understanding, and the participation in international programs to encourage an understanding of people. Part of the ten leaflets are practical in focus and offer an overview of the wealth of materials available in the field of international education, hints on how to help children relate to children of other countries and cultures, and concrete suggestions for making the most of travel. Many activities are included that can be used in the classroom, professional and social groups, the church-school, the library, the Scout troop, and recreation department programs with children and adults.   [More]  Descriptors: Cross Cultural Studies, Elementary Education, Global Approach, Human Relations

Fine, Esther Sokolov (1997). Shaping and Reshaping Practice: Preparing Teachers for Peacemaking, Theory into Practice. Describes several exploratory sites where peacemaking is becoming an integral part of teacher education and reeducation within a university, research site, and student teaching practicum. The paper introduces a peacemaking school, highlighting shared learning of an experienced and a student teacher who wrote, read, talked, listened, and problem solved in their classroom. Descriptors: Bias, Conflict Resolution, Elementary Education, Elementary School Teachers

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. (1989). Nuclear Age Education Curriculum. The primary goal of the Oregon nuclear age education curriculum is to develop in students the knowledge and skills needed to meet the challenges of living in a nuclear age. This curriculum is developed around five general themes, each corresponding to a specific unit. The general goals for the units are: (Unit 1) to increase students' exposure to the world outside themselves, to other cultures, and to the natural and physical world; (Unit 2) to increase students' critical thinking skills and understanding of how people make decisions and form attitudes; (Unit 3) to promote skills of constructive communication and conflict resolution; (Unit 4) to increase students' knowledge of nuclear technology and their understanding of its benefits and limitations; and (Unit 5) to increase students' understanding of armed conflict and modern weapons issues. This is a K-12 curriculum, but many of the topics in units 4 and 5 are more appropriate for older children. For the most part, the lessons should be integral parts of existing curricula. Care has been taken to provide teachers with examples of what might be done to promote nuclear age education in nearly all subject areas. The units are not designed to be taught in sequence and can be integrated into the curriculum whenever the teachers wishes. Whenever possible, lessons and activities should involve students in direct, first-hand experiences. The lessons presented can be adopted directly, adapted to a particular school's needs, or taken as suggestions of what might be developed. A bibliography lists 30 curriculum materials, 50 books, pamphlets, articles, 50 teaching resources, 21 organizations, 9 sources for nuclear statistics, and 11 supplements and bibliographies.   [More]  Descriptors: Conflict Resolution, Critical Thinking, Elementary Secondary Education, Global Approach

Byrne, Jonny; Jarman, Neil (2011). Ten Years after Patten: Young People and Policing in Northern Ireland, Youth & Society. Through a comprehensive review of existing literature, this article documents young people's experiences of policing during the period of political transition and extensive reform of the structures of policing in Northern Ireland since the publication of the Independent Commission on Policing for Northern Ireland (The Patten Report) in 1999. The article explores the nature and context of these relationships and provides a commentary of how young people's experiences and perceptions of policing have been shaped by their social, economic, and community backgrounds. Furthermore, a number of ideas and activities that have been developed with the aim of improving the attitudes of young people toward the police, the attitudes of police officers toward young people, and the interactions between the two are also discussed.   [More]  Descriptors: Social Change, Police, Young Adults, Education Work Relationship

Schmidt, Fran; Friedman, Alice (1983). Creative Conflict Solving for Kids. Both student and teacher materials for a unit introducing elementary students to conflict situations and conflict resolution techniques are presented. The student materials contain pre- and posttests and 27 exercises in which students examine emotions, love and friendship, frustration, learned behavior, and basic needs, and explore different ways to resolve conflicts. Activities include word scrambles, puzzles, games, simulations, writing assignments, problem solving, and question-answer exercises. The teacher's guide contains overall unit objectives and concepts as well as teaching suggestions, vocabulary, and extension activities for each of the student exercises. Pen and ink drawings of five conflict situations with which elementary students can identify conclude the unit.  Descriptors: Behavioral Objectives, Conflict, Conflict Resolution, Decision Making

Donnelly, Warren H. (1990). Managing Proliferation in the 1990s, "Something Borrowed, Something New…", Social Education. Assesses the progress and the challenges that education must meet in identifying world policy for proliferation management. Gives a historical perspective on attempts to control proliferation. Includes maps, charts, a historical chronology of these efforts, and a list of proliferation management issues. Descriptors: Citizenship Education, Controversial Issues (Course Content), Global Approach, Instructional Materials

Schmidt, Fran; And Others (1992). Mediation for Kids: Kids in Dispute Settlement. Second Edition. The Kids in Dispute Settlement mediation program for grades 3 through 12 recognizes that conflicts are a part of everyone's life and that students can responsibly and constructively solve their own conflicts. Mediation uses the help of a third party to facilitate the conflict resolution process by working out differences non-judgementally. Student mediators are used because they do not threaten other students and can promote cooperation. Mediator training lessons are organized sequentially. They include objective, vocabulary, procedure, student pages, introduction, discussion questions, and closure. Student mediators should reflect the school population; and it must be clearly recognized that disputes involving weapons, drugs, and physical or sexual abuse are not cases for mediation. Confidentiality is emphasized, and a procedure is explained for situations in which mediation does not resolve the conflict. The following sections are presented: (1) "Setting the Stage"; (2) "Understanding Conflict"; (3) "Listening, Paraphrasing, Probing"; and (4) "The Mediation Process." Each section contains student activities to reinforce the messages and provide mediation practice. Descriptors: Children, Classroom Techniques, Communication Skills, Conflict Resolution

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